Interactive Experience Design

Interactive Experience Design

Interactive Experience Design

Exhibit for the Tate Museum

The purpose of this document is to discuss the making of a plan for the construction of an exhibit. The goal is to construct this as a public display within the Tate Museum. This exhibit would be for the purposes of education, study, enrichment, and enjoyment. The exhibit would be installed in the Tate Museum to serve these purposes for the museum’s members, its visitors, and society in general. One of the major shifts in museum and exhibit design in the last decade has been a focus on visitor experience. Because of this trend, the exhibit will be an interactive display. This interactivity will aid the Tate Museum in reaching its goals.

This document will present the Concept Development phase for the exhibit. It will provide the “road map” for the project. It discusses where the project is going, how it will get there, and a definition of the resources available to complete the project. It will discuss the scope and character of the exhibit project also. An overall graphic identity for the exhibit will be presented.

A complete package will be presented, which will illustrate the full exhibit design. This will include how it will be built, where every component is located, and how each will work within the larger space of the Tate Museum.

A “Touch Wall” Experience

One area of this exhibit will consist of a “Touch Wall” Experience. It will utilize a technology called “The Presenter”. The Presenter Touch Wall is a 65″ multi-touch display supporting up to 40 touch points. It is available in Active 3D, LED, LCD, HD, or 4k Ultra HD configurations. It has a solid-state optical multi-touch system, with up to 40 points for simultaneous touch. This allows for multiple users simultaneously interacting with the display. The Presenter has ultra-high definition displays, which provide a new standard for immersive interaction: a retinal display at arms-length.

More information regarding this technology, and its use for a museum exhibit, can be found at the following Website: http://ideum.com/touch-walls/presenter-65/. An example of this technology, shown, as a mock-up would appear in an exhibit for the Tate Museum, is presented in the following illustration. This shows a concept of how the multi-touch display would be installed, as a feature within an exhibit area of the Tate Museum. The “Touch Wall” is shown as the color portion of the illustration, where the image of Saturn has been inserted into the mock-up of the Tate Museum’s exhibit area.

Museum Display

Museum Display of a Presentation Wall

With this technology, a user could access the graphic design displayed to do various activities. The main one proposed is an interactive game, similar to a Concentration style of game. The concept would be that of a matching game with various images displayed when the user selects a particular “square” on the game’s graphic display. The selected “square” would then reveal a representative piece of artwork that is displayed in the Tate Museum. The object would then be for the user to uncover that artwork’s match under another “square”. In this manner, users could compete against each other, as an entertaining experience, while learning about the Tate Museum’s exhibits. When the user or users complete a set of several questions correctly, they will earn points. As an incentive to continue playing the game, the more games the user completes, the more points they earn. These points could be used in the Bookstore area or the Café of the museum, to be applied towards purchases of merchandise, beverages, or snack items.

A representation of how this game exhibit would appear is shown here.

ConcentrationmGame

Another Interactive Exhibit – Tate Museum Time Line

Another type of display planned for this exhibit would be very interactive for the users. It would entail the display of the Tate Museum Time Line, which had been produced as a static display previously. This Tate Museum Time Line would be presented on a large display screen. It would be a touch screen, which would incorporate holograms, video, and lasers. The user would select a particular era of time, or a category of art, from the Tate Museum’s Time Line.

The technology used behind this exhibit would scan the user’s face, using a mapping technique. It would then consult the computer’s database for any images that would approximate the facial features recorded from the user’s mapped image. It would then display a holographic image nearby (in a vacant space adjacent to the user’s position). This hologram would be of some representative artwork from the time period, or the art category, which the user had selected from the Time Line on the display screen.

The hologram would symbolize the user’s facial expression. The user could then experiment with the pulse laser illumination of the holographic image created by their facial movements. In this way, they would create dramatic slithers of themselves, which have been intertwined with the holographic image that they had selected from their choice on the Time Line.

An example of the controls, which would be utilized for this touch screen exhibit, is shown below.

Display Screen for exhibit

Display Screen for exhibit

Another Interactive Exhibit – Wearable Headset Technology

Another display planned for this exhibit would be interactive and controlled by a wearable headset. The premise for this exhibit is as follows:

When people view an image, our brains react to it immediately in a way similar to brains of other people. Research done at Aalto University in Finland has shown these results to be true. By employing images of artwork, it is possible to investigate the function of the human brain. Viewing an image creates multi-level changes in the brain function. Despite the complexity of the stimulus, the elicited brain activity patterns can show remarkable similarities across different people — even at the time scale of fractions of seconds.

In this exhibit, the users would utilize these headsets to record their brain signals while viewing various examples of artwork displayed in the Tate Museum. Their results could be compared to other participants’ results. This could reveal important similarities between brain signals of different people during viewing. The results could imply that the contents of the images affect certain brain functions of the subjects in a similar manner.

One example of this type of wearable technology is shown in the following photograph.

Wearable Headset

Wearable Headset

This device would be controlled by the brain activity of the user. Using electrical brain recordings, the user could have his or her brain signals sent via an Internet connection which could then map and record these signals. They could then be compared to another user’s brain signals, for similarities or differences in their patterns.

The computers to which these devices are connected could detect those brain signals, interpret what they mean, and use them to direct a device of some kind. It can also work the other way around. For example, the computers could figure out what signals are sent to the brain by the optic nerve when someone sees the color red, for instance, in a piece of the Tate Museum’s artwork collection.

One application for the technology in this display would be to measure the user’s emotions or the facial expressions of the user. As an example, a wearable device called the “Emotiv” can currently measure some emotions such as attention, excitement, focus, interest, meditation, frustration, relaxation, stress levels, and engagement versus boredom. The Emotiv Company admits, “The names may not perfectly reflect exactly what the emotion is, and says that they may be renamed before market launch.” More information regarding this technology, and its use for a museum exhibit, can be found at the following Website: http://emotiv.co/.

An example of one of these Emotiv wearable devices is shown in this photograph.

emotiv wearable device

emotiv wearable device

Another application that this technology could support is that of evaluating facial expressions. For instance, expressions such as smiling, laughing, clenching, and smirking can currently be detected via a wearable device. (Other expressions may be added to the device.) The facial expressions are detected by the EEG sensors in the device, which pick up signals to facial muscles, rather than by reading brainwaves. Unlike reading mental activity, these detections are very fast (10ms) conveying a decisive advantage and rendering them suitable for fast paced games in the FPS genre.

Environments for Exhibits

Some examples of the prospective environments for these exhibits will be presented here:

Environment for the Tate Museum Time Line Interactive Exhibit

Time Line Museum Exhibit

Time Line Museum Exhibit

This photograph represents a mock-up of the environment area for the Tate Museum Time Line exhibit. It shows the display screen with the graphic of the Tate Museum’s Time Line, as it would be illuminated on the screen.

Environment for the Wearable Headset Exhibit

emotiv Wearable Headset Device

emotiv Wearable Headset Device

This photograph represents a mock-up of the environment area for the Wearable Headset exhibit. It shows a user wearing a representative device. The computer connected to this device would detect the user’s brain signals and use these signals to control and direct the action occurring around them.

Visualizations for the Interactive Exhibits

Interactive "Touch Wall" Experience

Interactive “Touch Wall” Experience

Visualization of the “Touch Wall” Experience

 

Visualization of the Tate Museum Time Line Exhibit

Visitor Interacts with Time Line Ehibit

Visitor Interacts with Time Line Exhibit

Visualization of the Wearable Headset Exhibit

Video Demonstration of using a wearable headset

Video Demonstration of using a wearable headset

Visualization of two representative Holographic Images

Holographic Image of a person

Holographic Image of a person

Holographic Image of a user's face

Holographic Image of a user’s face

These photographs exemplify the holographic images that could result from the user’s interaction with the Tate Museum Time Line Exhibit. The second photograph symbolizes the holographic image created by their facial movements of the user, as read by the computer technology of the user’s face.

In summary, this document has laid out the making of a plan for the construction of an exhibit. The goal is to construct this as a public display within the Tate Museum.